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Fellows

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Brittany Barker, B.S. Oregon State University, 2003
2007-09 E-MRGE Fellow
Brittany (a.k.a. Brit) is a doctoral student in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico under the advisorship of Dr. Robert B. Waide and Dr. Joe Cook. Brittany’s past and present research has dealt with topics in quantitative genetics, herpetology, biogeography, conservation biology and landscape genetics of terrestrial vertebrates (mainly reptiles, amphibians and birds). She is currently working on a historical biogeography study of two frogs in Puerto Rico that have different habitat associations. For a more detailed description of Brittany’s current research and professional accomplishments, click here. Her hobbies include drawing, painting, ultimate frisbee, hiking, birding, herping, traveling to tropical places, and exploring. Born in Oregon, Brittany has lived up and down the west coast from Los Angeles to Seattle and sometimes misses the lush, green forests. Through the GK-12 program, she strives to become an effective teacher by providing hands-on labs and activities that foster an appreciation and greater understanding of science among young students.

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Andrew Edelman, B.S. Willamette University, 1999
2006-2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Andrew is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico under the advisorship of Dr. Astrid Kodric-Brown. Andrew's past and present research has focused on the ecology and behavior of small mammals including chipmunks, tree squirrels, and kangaroo rats. Currently, Andrew is examining delayed dispersal and parental investment in banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis). Andrew's study area is located on the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge near Socorro, New Mexico. Banner-tailed kangaroo rats are a keystone species of Southwestern desert grasslands that build large, dirt mounds containing extensive burrow systems and seed caches. The conspicuous mounds allow this kangaroo rat to be easily found and trapped making them excellent subjects for ecological studies. In addition, banner-tailed kangaroo rats exhibit many unusual behaviors for a small rodent. Female banner-tailed kangaroo rats allow offspring to reside at the natal mound for 2-7 months after weaning. Also, some females will bequeath mounds to offspring and move to adjacent mounds.

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Leah Johnson, B.S. Cornell College, 2005
2007-2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Leah is currently aPh.D. candidate in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at UNM. Her research interests include paleoclimatology and isotope geochemistry. Aside from science, she loves art, dance, photography, books, and the outdoors. Leah grew up just north of Chicago, Illinois, and misses deep dish pizza.

Leah is excited to take part in the GK-12 program. Her first teaching experience was in the summer of 2000 when she worked at an ecology center summer camp as a visiting artist, designing science-related art projects for kids and leading instruction. Leah worked in a tutoring center after college, where she was able to interact with students of all ages and abilities in a variety of subjects. Recently, she had the opportunity to teach college level environmental science lab classes as a graduate student.

Jessica C. Lopez-Pearce, B.S. University of Arizona, 2001
2007-2009 E-MRGE Fellow
Jessica is an M.S. student in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at UNM. Her research interests include tectonics, sedimentology, geochemistry, and geoscience education. She is currently studying the role of groundwater in the deposition of the Hualapai Limestone of the Grand Wash Trough in Arizona and Nevada.

Jessica has been interested in the geosciences since she was very young and her parents took her on family road trips through the national parks. Since then, she has worked as a Park Ranger at Sunset Crater National Monument, Grand Canyon National Park, and Mesa Verde National Park, where she taught visitors about the parks’ unique natural and cultural histories. Jessica decided to return to graduate school after working for the National Park Service and the Southern Ute Indian Tribe so she could further study the geology of the American southwest and acquire geosciences teaching skills. Jessica currently lives in Albuquerque but her home is in northern Arizona where her husband, Dave, and parents reside. 

Daniella Swenton Olson, B.S. University of Vermont, 2003
2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Daniella is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico under the advisorship of Dr. Astrid Kodric-Brown (http://biology.unm.edu/biology/kodric/). Daniella’s past and present research has dealt with topics in plant-animal interactions, animal conservation, and behavioral and evolutionary ecology with taxa including insects, fur seals and fish. Currently, Daniella is examining the maintenance of speciation in two hybridizing fishes found in New Mexico. Her friends think it is funny that she moved to the desert to study fish as she grew up on the coast of Maine and misses all of its aquatic habitats. Her hobbies include reading, drawing, exploring the outdoors with her husband and their three dogs, and baking a mean chocolate chip cookie. She is happy to provide recipes. Through the GK12 program Daniella hopes to inspire young people to wonder at the natural world around them and instill in them a sense of responsibility for its future.

Yadéeh E. Sawyer, B.S. University of New Mexico, 2004
2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Yadéeh is a doctoral student in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico under the advisorship of Dr. Joseph A. Cook. Yadéeh’s current research deals with the phylogeography of 3 small mammals in Southeast Alaska. In other words, she is looking at the genetic evolution of shrews, voles and deer mice and how it relates to the geographical location and barriers throughout their history.  This is important because these small mammals reside in the Tongass National Forest, part of the largest remaining temperate rainforest in the world. However, the logging and anthropogenic impacts are significant, threatening the well-being of these, and many other organisms, that inhabit the area. Their history is complicated by the patters of glacial cover during the last ice age, which created possible refugial populations.

Yadéeh’s hobbies include backpacking, hiking, photography, traveling (when possible) and playing games with friends.  She was born in Santa Fe, NM, but has also lived in Miami, Florida.  While in Miami, she worked as a lab tech in a genetics lab and was a high school biology teacher.  Living in Florida allowed her to appreciate New Mexico for all the beauty it holds, and the lack of humidity! Once back here in New Mexico, she has been the TA for both the introductory cellular and genetics courses at UNM. Her website is http://www.unm.edu/~yadeeh

Karen Michelsen, B.A. Bucknell (1982), M.A.Ed. Virginia Tech. (1990), B.S. Virginia Tech, 2003
2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Karen is an incoming Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at UNM.  Her research interests include paleomagnetism, tectonics, and structural geology.  At present her dissertation project will focus on the emplacement of the Alta Stock (located in the Wasatch Range) utilizing various paleomagnetic and pertrochemical techniques under the supervision of Dr. John Geissman and Dr. Penny King.

Karen’s interest in geoscience and sharing this information with others stems from a voracious curiosity, a love of learning and a long history of moving and leading groups through various landscapes as an outdoor educator, river guide, and Outward Bound instructor.  She has worked in far flung places as Alaska, Grand Canyon, Cascades, Sierra, Tetons, Joshua Tree, Mexico and many rivers of the Southern Appalachians.  Most recently she has been teaching high school Earth Science in rural Southwest Virginia where the most difficult aspect of moving to New Mexico was saying farewell to her students.  Karen anticipates that the GK-12 program will provide ample opportunities for continuing to facilitate helping young people get “fired up” about learning and empowering them to pursue their dreams.

Shawn 'Fred' Whiteman, B.A. Hollins University, 2007
2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Fred is a doctoral student in the Department of Biology, studying with Dr. Felisa Smith.  Her research interests are broad, but her current focus is on the biogeography of ancient ecosystems.  She is studying the Great American Biotic Interchange, and also the geometric morphometrics of woodrat (Neotoma) teeth.  Her undergraduate research concerned the community ecology of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) and reptile communities.  She is thrilled to hone her teaching skills and meet some amazing New Mexicans with the GK-12 program this year.  Her career goal is to teach and study biology at a liberal arts college.  In her spare time, Fred is an avid knitter.

Owen Shufeldt, B.S. (2007), M.A.T. James Madison University, 2008
2008-2009 E-MRGE Fellow
Owen is an M.S. student in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at UNM. His research interests include structural geology, tectonics and geoscience education. He is currently working to unravel the tectonic history of the Paleoproterozoic basement rocks in the Upper Gorge of the Grand Canyon. The brunt of his research lies in the enigmatic Crystal shear zone; a high strain zone marking the accretion of volcanic island arc rocks to the early continent of Laurentia. This research entails detailed bedrock mapping, micro to macro-structural studies, and radiogenic isotope systematics of detrital zircons.

Growing up in the Catskill Mountains of New York, Owen always had a strong affinity and appreciation for the geosciences. He was inspired by a high school Earth science teacher and sought to teach the subject himself. To accomplish this goal, he moved to the beautiful and geologically interesting Shenandoah Valley of Virginia to attend James Madison University. While completing a B.S. in geology at JMU he minored in secondary education and eventually earned a Master of Arts in Teaching. He holds a Virginia middle and secondary education teaching license in Earth and Space science. In addition to multiple practicum placements and two nine-week stints as a student teacher in various middle and high schools in Virginia, Owen has also been employed as a teaching assistant for the JMU Geology and Environmental Science six-week field course in the spectacular Connemara country of western Ireland.

During his training as a geoscience educator, Owen utilized an inquiry-based and student-centered approach to teaching science. With this, he hopes that his students will attain higher levels of thinking in the geosciences. Through the GK-12 program he looks forward to expanding his teaching abilities while instilling in his students the same excitement and respect for science that he feels.

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Juliana S. Medieros, B.S. University of New Mexico, 2000
2006-2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Juliana is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in the UNM Department of Biology.  Her research interests include plant physiological ecology of arid and semi-arid ecosystems, and her dissertation focuses on physiological adaptations to freezing in the genus Larrea.  She enjoys spending time in the field in New Mexico and Central Mexico, as well as many hours in the greenhouse and lab.  Her interest in plants was preceded by an interest in human physiological adaptations, and as an undergraduate she studied biological anthropology.  Her first experience with plants was growing a garden with her son, where she became fascinated with the ways in which plants are physiologically adapted to their environments.  She has spent the last 9 years practicing and teaching science at both college and K12 levels, and particularly enjoys helping students answer their own questions using the scientific process.  An environmentalist from a very young age, Juliana has also delved into the field of sustainability, and hopes to inspire an ethic of environmental stewardship in her students.  Through the GK12 program Juliana looks forward to gaining the experience she needs to become a leader in scientific education while at the same time empowering young people to pursue their dreams.

Anthony C. Salem, B.S. Arizona State University, 1999
2006-2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Tony is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at UNM. His research interests include structural geology and tectonics, orogenic systems, geology of the southwestern U.S., and geoscience education. He is currently studying the kinematics and timing of brittle and ductile deformation events in response to oceanic plate subduction along the southwestern margin of North America during the Mesozoic Era in southeastern California.

Tony’s interest in the Earth sciences began about 5 years ago when he hiked all around Arizona with a group of “weekend warriors”. Not content to just hike around, Tony wanted to learn more about the landscapes he was hiking through; the rest is history. Although he is interested in various areas of geology (and is dabbling in ecology), he settled on structural geology because of the cool field trips and largely due to his former advisor and mentor, Steve Reynolds at ASU, who supported and encouraged him early on and throughout his student career. Tony lives in Albuquerque with his wife, Audrey, and their two children, and has a large extended family, most of who live in the Phoenix metro area.

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Jessica R. Snider, B.S. Texas State University, 1999
2006-2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Jessica is currently working on her Ph.D. in the Biology Department.  Her research interests include cave ecology, nutrient cycling in cave systems and surface/subsurface interactions in karst environments and science education and communication. Jessica’s dissertation research is investigating microbial communities and nutrient cycling related to roots growing into cave systems. Jessica first got interested in exploring caves in 1996 as a freshman at Texas State University. As a member of the Southwest Texas and Hays County Cave Clubs, she has caved in Texas and Mexico.  While living in Tokyo, Japan, she started to get very interested in cave formation and cave biology.  She later returned to the U.S. and then joined the Northup/Pockman labs at UNM. 

Jessica grew up the daughter of professors and was taught the importance of the education from a young age.  She haa been engaged in some form of education for most of her life, from tutoring to teaching English as a Second Language, and is currently very interested in how to teach science to students of all ages and to the general public. This led to her desire to work with the GK-12 program. As part of the program, Jessica is working in collaboration with fellows Tony Salem and Brittany Barker and teachers Daniel Cano (main teacher), Carissa Green and Kim Orphal on developing multidisciplinary lessons.

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Mel Strong, B.S. California State University Sacramento, 1998, M.S. Washington State University, 2001
2006-2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Mel is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at UNM.  His dissertation work is based upon discovering the source of atmospheric water vapor in New Mexico.  Consequently, his research is multidisciplinary in nature, including meteorology, climate, stable isotope geochemistry, and atmospheric chemistry.  The core of his research involves collecting air samples from New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas, both at ground level and in the air in his experimental aircraft.  His previous research was in volcanology, where he discovered new details on how basaltic magma travels through the crust.

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Jason Thomas, B.S. University of Alaska Southeast, 2003
2007-2009 E-MRGE Fellow
Jason is a doctoral student in the Department of Biology a the University of New Mexico. His advisor is Joseph Cook, Curator of Mammals at the Museum of Southwestern Biology at UNM.  His current research is on the phylogenetic structure of the Sin Nombre Hantavirus in the southwest. He has been gathering data of genetic sequences of the Sin Nombre virus around New Mexico.  Had he known that Hantavirus is so hard to work with he might have chosen some thing else to study, but too late for that now.  He is also working with Jerry Dragoo on the phylogenetics of Peromyscus maniculatus. This small rodent is the zoonotic host of the Sin Nombre virus in the wild.

During the first year and a half of graduate school he studied yeast genomics in Dr. Margret Werner-Washburne's laboratory.  His research was focused on the changes that happen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during growth to stationary phase.  More can be read about this on the education and research page.

Over the last few years he has had the opportunity to do some mammal trapping around New Mexico.  This has allowed him to learn more about the small critters that my research currently focuses on. His interests in science all have to do with evolution.

This semester he is taking a class on speciation with one of his committee members,Vaishali Katju, and it is proving to be very interesting

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Robin Warne, Degree and College, Grad Year
2006-2008 E-MRGE Fellow
Robin's research interests include resource dynamics in ecological communities as well as the ecology, physiology and evolution of life histories. In his current research, Robin examines the linkage between resource dynamics at the community level with allocation patterns in individual consumers. Robin hasexplored these processes by (1) linking abiotic drivers to temporal resource dynamics in food webs; and (2) investigating how such resource variation affects the reproductive allocation strategies of lizards.

Approaches: field based ecology, laboratory based physiology experiments, stable isotope methodology, and modeling.

Bethany Theiling, B.A. Florida State Univ. (2003), M.S. Univerisity of Georgia, 2005
2008-2009 E-MRGE Fellow
Bethany Theiling is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.  Her current research interests include: 1) The use of stable oxygen and radiogenic neodymium isotopes to identify changes in sea level and temperature during climatically warm (greenhouse) time periods, that if correct, suggest that glacial ice was both present and fluctuated on the thousand-year time-scale throughout the Phanerozoic, regardless of overall climate and pCO2 conditions,and 2) The use of rare earth elements (REE’s) and radiogenic isotopes to determine whether adjacent megafans are geochemically distinct, that if correct, will aid in characterizing the nature and extent of petroleum and ore deposits and aquifer systems.  Bethany’s passion for teaching stems from her experience with a plethora of incredible science teachers, including her father, who demonstrated that science and science education could be exciting and engaging.  Her goal is to relate her excitement to the next generation of students; that science is both exciting and an important part of our everyday lives.

Stephanie Yurchyk, B.S. University of Rochester, 2007
2008-2009 E-MRGE Fellow
Stephanie is currently a Masters candidate in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico.  Her research interests include carbonate sedimentology/stratigraphy, geochemistry, paleoceanography and paleoclimatology.  More specifically, she focuses on understanding whether or not paleoclimate change was responsible for driving sea-level changes on the million-year time scale in the Early Triassic “apparent” greenhouse.  She is attacking this multi-faceted problem by comparing the change in depositional environment through time based on changes in the rock lithologies with the oxygen isotopic record acquired from biogenic apatite.

Stephanie graduated from the University of Rochester with degrees in Geology and Russian Studies and completed a fifth-year as a Take-Five Scholar studying issues facing women in politics.  Her passion for teaching began in 2003 when she became a teaching assistant at the Capital Region Education Council (CREC) Summer Institute for Political Studies over her summer break.  She continued to teach for four more summers, joining the teaching staff for the international studies program in her final year.  In the future, Stephanie plans to combine her interests in science and politics.

Teachers

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Theresa Apodaca, 6th Grade Science
Sarracino Middle School, Socorro, NM
Teacher Biography

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Destini Baldonado, 8th Grade Science
Sarracino Middle School, Socorro, NM
Teacher Biography

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Daniel Cano, 7th and 8th Grade Science
Belen Middle School, Belen, NM
Teacher Biography

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Carissa Green, 7th and 8th Grade Science
Belen Middle School, Belen, NM
In her second year teaching at Belen Middle School, Carissa teaches 8th grade physical science. She obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Biology and minor in Psychology at University of Texas, Arlington. Her hobbies include golfing, riding horses, shopping, and traveling. She lives in Tomé with her husband, Trevor, and has two horses and two cats. She loves Texas country music…the kind with rock in it and not too “poppy.”

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Dale Jaramillo, 7th GradeLife Science
Belen Middle School, Belen, NM
A 7th grade life sciences teacher at Belen Middle School, Dale Jaramillo has been teaching life sciences for four years. He was born and raised in Belen, New Mexico. After obtaining a bachelor’s degree in University Studies at the University of New Mexico, he completed a teaching certification program at the College of Santa Fe. For two years, Dale taught at a private school in Belen, St. Mary’s, and then transferred to Belen Middle School two years ago. Dale lives in Belen with his wife and their three children. When he is not chasing around his kids at home, he loves to fly fish. He is a big fan of Belen middle school and high school athletics. His primary goal as a teacher is to teach kids how to learn.

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Kenda Meathenia, 7th Grade Life Science
Belen Middle School, Belen, NM
Kenda is a 7th grade life science teacher and MESA (Mathematical, Engineering, Science Achievement) sponsor at Belen Middle School (BMS). She is a true New Mexican, being born and raised in Farmington, NM. She earned a Bachelors in Elementary Education from the University of New Mexico San Juan Campus and now has her Masters Degree. She began her 12 year (and counting) teaching career at a BIA boarding school in Bloomfield, NM where she taught 4th and 5th grade. Since Kenda began teaching, she has taught 3rd - 7th grades in Phoenix Arizona, Albuquerque, Los Lunas and Belen, New Mexico. This is her 4th year at Belen Middle school.

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Stacy Smith, 8th Grade Physical Science
Laguna Middle School
Stacy has been a teacher for the last six years, this being her first at Laguna Middle School. She graduated from New Mexico State University in 2002 with a BS in Education and a minor in science. Before coming to LMS she taught middle school in the Las Cruces school district; she was also born and raised there. She enjoys teaching physical science, and is excited to be learning more about life science. At LMS she coaches volleyball and in the little spare time she has, she likes to play soccer.

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Michael Gavlak, 6th Grade Science
Laguna Middle School
Mr. Gavlak really enjoys living in New Mexico.  Having been born and raised on the East Coast the open spaces of New Mexico appeal to him. He grew up in Staten Island, New York and attended SUNY Geneseo where he graduated with a B.S. in Education.  He later attended Plymouth State University in New Hampshire where he received a Masters in Environmental Science and Education.  He has taught for the Laguna Department of Education, at the Elementary School and here at the Middle school for the last twelve years. He has taught grades 4-8 but enjoys teaching Middle School science most.  He also likes to go hiking and take pictures, both of which he has combined with outdoor education in the after school program Project Venture.  He owns some land where he keeps a small herd of cows and several horses.

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Kathleen Herrera, 6th Grade Science
Laguna Middle School
Ms. Herrera is a Laguna Tribal member and grew up in this community.  She attended Fort Lewis College in Durango Colorado, where she received my B.S. in Bilingual Education.  She has also taken classes at UNM, and the College of Santa Fe.  Her first teaching job was with the Bernalillo Public Schools at Cochiti Elementary School for four years.  She then went on to teach at the BIA Contract School at Tohajiile, on the Navajo Reservation.  She taught at this school for 23 years.  While there she was involved in the NASA Explores Teachers Program, where she was able to meet and learn about many scientists that work at NASA.  She has taught at Laguna Middle School for last three years.  In her spare time she likes to sew, cook and do wood burning art.

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Kathleen Robertson, 6th Grade Science
Laguna Middle School
Ms. Robertson was born in Buffalo, New York and grew up in the Allegany Mountains.  Most of her teaching experience has been with children in treatment facilities such as Desert Hills Charter Hospital and Memorial Hospital. She has also taught at Sky City Elementary School before coming to Laguna, where she has taught for the last five years (two at the Elementary School and the last three at the Middle School).  She also enjoy outdoor activities like hiking and fishing, and especially rock hunting and collecting. On Sundays she likes to read the paper and drink coffee in bed with my husband.  Peter is also a teacher.  He has taught math at CNM for the last 16 years, and they have two adopted sons.

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Kim Orphal, 8th Grade Science
Belen Middle School, Belen, NM
Teacher Biography

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Heather Yazzie, Project Venture Experiential Coordinator
Laguna Midddle School
Heather received her B.S. from Northern Arizona University in 2002 (Mathematics and Education). She is an outdoor leadership coordinator for Laguna Middle School Project Venture.  She leads the experiential education program at Laguna Middle School by providing in-school and after-school activities as well as field trips to the student participants. She has been with the National Indian Youth Leadership Project’s (NIYLP) Project Venture for two years. Prior to her role with Laguna Middle School, Heather worked with the Acoma Middle School NIYLP program Venturing Beyond Prevention, a combined program of adventure therapy and prevention. Heather has five years experience in experiential education, as well as two years experience teaching 5-8th grades in Phoenix, Arizona.
In additional to her teaching and leadership roles, Heather is currently a graduate student at Prescott College, pursuing a MA in Adventure Education with applications in adventure therapy. Heather grew up on the White Mountain Apache Reservation in White River, Arizona and enjoys backpacking and running.

Program Directors (PI's)

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Scott L. Collins, Degree and College, Grad Year
Scott's research investigates the role of climate variability, fire and herbivores on community structure and ecosystem processes in mesic and arid grasslands in North America and South Africa. Scott is currently a Professor of Biology at the University of New Mexico and the Principal Investigator on the Sevilleta Long-term Ecological Research Program (LTER). The overarching goal of the Sevilleta LTER, established in 1989, is to understand how abiotic drivers and constraints affect dynamics and stability in aridland populations, communities, and ecosystems. Using both long term measurements and experimental manipulations, Scott and his colleagues are particularly interested in determining how global environmental change will affect moisture inputs and losses, biogeochemical cycles, and responses by producers and consumers.

Scott has worked extensively in tallgrass prairie as part of the Konza Prairie Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) Program since 1988. Scott is also involved in a multi-institution Ecosystem Convergence research project comparing fire, climate and herbivore effects on tallgrass prairie in North America (Konza Prairie) and mesic savanna grassland in Kruger National Park and the Ukulinga Research Farm in South Africa.

Since coming to UNM in 2003, Scott helped to establish an ESA SEEDS Chapter in the Biology Department with student advisors Jolene Trujillo and Rene Aguilera. The SEEDS mission is to, diversify and advance the profession of ecology by promoting opportunities that stimulate and nurture the interest of underrepresented students.

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Laura J. Crossey, Ph.D. University of Wyoming, 1985
Laura is a Professor in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico, specializing in sedimentary geochemistry. Laura's research interests include clastic diagenesis, aqueous and organic geochemistry, and geomicrobiology, with emphasis on interaction of organic and inorganic constituents of sedimentary rocks during progressive burial. Laura's research approach includes field examination of modern early diagenetic environments (biogeochemistry of water and sediments) as well as core and outcrop evaluations of sandstone and shale diagenesis.

Laura has advised over 35 undergraduate theses and 30 MS and PhD graduates students at UNM. She also served as Associate Dean for the College of Arts & Sciences for three years. She has also been active in obtaining funding for graduate and undergraduate training through NSF's Education and Human Resources division: she has been Co-investigator on two IGERT awards from NSF (in Freshwater Sciences). She is dedicated to increasing minority participation in the geosciences (and sciences in general) and has serves as the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation PI for the past 6 years, and is PI on an LSAMP Bridges to the Doctorate program in 2008-2010. At the state level, she serves on the Governor's Math/Science Advisory Council (2007-2010), and was a member of the State Science Standards Committee which completed the existing NM state science standards for K-12 in 2004. She is actively engaged in Geoscience outreach and informal education: with her husband, Karl Karlstrom, she is Co-investigator in an NSF funded geoscience exhibit at Grand Canyon (the Trail of Time) slated for completion in 2010, and has been featured in several science documentaries: "Grand Canyon" and "The Rockies" on the National Geographic channel. Laura is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America.

 

 

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